THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP: A FAMILY STRENGTH

Author:

Tawana Bandy, B.S. and Kristin Anderson Moore, Ph.D.

TRENDS, CHILD  FACT SHEET, Publication 2008-27, August 2008

BACKGROUND:

The great majority of parents have positive and nurturing relationships with their children.1 In fact, findings from research show that parents and their adolescent children generally have close emotional ties.2-3 These findings run counter to anecdotal portrayals of parents as clueless and unconnected, especially when it comes to relating to their adolescent children.4 Recently released parent reported data from the 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH), which has a very large, nationally representative sample, provide a window into parent-child relationships by children’s specific ages. Child Trends drew on these data to look at three markers of these relationships for parents living with children between the ages of 6 and 17: parent-child closeness, the degree to which parents share ideas and talk about things that really matter with their children, and parents’ acquaintance with their children’s friends. Our analyses show that although some declines are seen in these areas as children get older, high parental involvement and positive parent-child interactions endure throughout childhood into the teenage years for most adolescents.

Full Text: THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP

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an ordinary woman
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One Response to THE PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIP: A FAMILY STRENGTH

  1. The parents talk to their children influences the relationship between them. But it is not enough because action is also needed. Playing with children will make you have closer relationship. You communicate with non-verbal language and often it is more powerful. The result will bring family in stronger relationship

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